7 Roadblocks that Side Track and even Derail Closing

canstockphoto14767089Purchasing a home can be both exciting and nerve-racking. Prospective homeowners face tremendous amounts of waiting as the home buying process ensues. Here is a list of everything that can go wrong during the closing of your new dream home.

Low Appraisals

Roughly 66 percent of buyers get financial assistance when purchasing a home. Mortgage lenders require appraisals of the property to determine the worth even if the buyer and seller have already agreed on a price. In the case of a low appraisal, the borrower can make up the difference, find financing elsewhere, pay for an additional appraisal or back out of the transaction completely.

Financing Challenges

Unfortunately, pre-approval doesn’t always ensure financing. Last minute problems may arise if the borrower loses a job, gets divorced, makes major financial purchases or experiences any other change in circumstances. Delays can occur as new financing is obtained.

Property Liens

Before closing, a title search will be conducted on the property. If there is any unpaid debt that lists the house as collateral, the sale can’t move forward until all liens are cleared up.

Needed Repairs

An inspection will be conducted to assess the integrity of the house. The inspectors will look for insect infestations, damaged roofs, leaky pipes and more that can lead to delays. If repairs are needed, both parties decide whether the seller will make repairs before closing or compensate the buyer for making the repairs at a later date.

Inspection Delays

Often, many buyers ask to do a walk-through of the home after the sellers have moved out. The closing may be delated as both parties decide how to handle any issues that may have occurred since the last showing. Issues include furniture or rugs concealing damage, movers putting holes in the wall and more. The initial purchase contract typically outlines how delays should be handled.

Changing Terms

In October 2015, three standard forms were replaced with the Loan Estimate form. Mortgage lenders must send one of these with the terms of the actual loan at least three business days prior to closing for the borrowers to review. If the terms need to be changed during this time, the three-day window resets and thus extends closing.

Unprepared Buyers

A buyer is expected to show up at closing with certain documents including copies of the homeowner’s insurance policy, proof of insurance payment, photo ID and certified funds for the closing costs. Failure to bring any of the above mentioned items will post pone the closing.